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Chicken Drumsticks w/ Green Beans

Hi friends! I’m so happy to be back in the kitchen and cooking you all something delicious! Today, I’m sharing with you guys my mom’s recipe on chicken drumsticks with green beans. This dish is a signature dish of hers and it’s also very special to me. It takes me back to the times spent peeling off the ends of the green beans on the kitchen table together and watching her on the side while she cooks. She made this for us all the time growing up and it never gets old for me. It’s simple, affordable, and best of all, it’s healthy. You might think it’s weird to keep the drumstick bones, but I think that’s exactly what makes this dish extraordinary. It’s there for those who like to eat meat off the bone or suck the bone marrow. It sounds weird, I know. But seriously though, it’s an Asian thing.

I like to think of this as a go-to meal on a laid back kind of day. Sam likes the green beans extra soft. Too soft in my opinion. He says squeaky (what he really means is crunchy) green beans is like nails scratching the chalkboard for me. He’s funny. If you guys give this recipe a try, be sure to let me know your thoughts by commenting something below. And oh – Happy August!

Chicken Drumsticks w/ Green Beans
Serves 4
Sharing with you my mother's dish. Simple, affordable, and healthy.
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Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
40 min
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
40 min
Ingredients
  1. 4-5 chicken drumsticks
  2. 2 lbs of green beans
  3. 1 tablespoon of oyster sauce
  4. 4-5 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  5. 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil
  6. salt to taste
  7. water, optional
Instructions
  1. Clean the chicken and pull off the skin to throw away. Slice off the majority of the meat, leaving a little meat left on the bone. With the meat you sliced off, slice them into small pieces.
  2. Peel off the ends of the green beans then give it a quick rinse or two. Onto a cutting board, slice them into long halves. Set aside.
  3. Over high heat, drizzle the oil into the cooking pot. Toss in the garlic and stir until they turn golden brown. Add in the chicken, salt, and then give it a quick stir. Let it cook for 5 minutes. You may add some water for broth.
  4. After 5 minutes or once the chicken is fully cooked, add in the green beans and oyster sauce.
  5. Stir-fry until green beans become soft or to your liking. Serve with rice.
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Vermicelli Noodle Salad

Mmm… Vermicelli noodle salad! This is love in a bowl. If you’ve had one of these before, you know what I’m talking about. It’s one of the main things I look forward to when I enter a Vietnamese restaurant. I’m crazy about it and as silly as this may sound, I’d pick this noodle salad over pho any day (and I’m not kidding)! Before Sam and I decide on a Vietnamese restaurant, I always ask two things: (1) “Are there vermicelli noodle salads?” and (2) “Do they have bahn mi sandwiches?” If I get a no for both of these questions, then I would very much rather go somewhere else. I know, I know. You pho lovers might be thinking, “But there’s still pho and pho is love and that’s all you need!” I also love pho but I happen to love the vermicelli noodle salad dish a lot more. 🙂 Anyways, this special recipe request was made by Nouta Vue. Thanks for requesting, Nouta!

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Kab Yaub (Hmong Egg Rolls)

One of my favorite childhood foods that have a special place in my heart – “Kab Yaub” or Hmong egg rolls. We made them occasionally and especially looked forward to family gatherings because chances were, we knew we would be having some. 😉 Aside from getting to eat them, I look forward to rolling the egg rolls the most because it takes so much skill to roll them beautifully. Can anyone else relate? It’s always so much fun to roll them with a group of family members and/or friends, especially when you’re making A LOT. It’s such a great opportunity to catch up and spend quality time. 🙂 At home before I married Sam, my mom, sisters and I would roll the egg rolls and my brothers would fry them outside in the garage. Very much like the times my family and I wrapped spring rolls, we also liked to compare our egg rolls. Egg rolls are well known as a delicious appetizer, but in my family, along with many other Hmong families, they’re much more than just appetizers. It’s more like a main dish for us. We would eat kab yaub with white rice, and then maybe some sauce or pepper on the side.

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Khao Khua (Toasted Sticky Rice Powder)

Khao khua or toasted sticky rice powder, is made from uncooked sticky rice. It’s an essential ingredient used in many Thai dishes. It gives off a toasted popcorn kernel fragrance, which helps Thai dishes to smell aromatic! The authentic way to achieve this ingredient is to toast the sticky rice over a low charcoal fire until golden brown, then transfer it into a mortar and pestle and pound them to a coarse powder. If you don’t have a charcoal fire close by like me, that’s okay, because I’m going to show you a simpler way to make khao khua at home using a frying pan that’ll still get the job done. Let’s do this!

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Nam Tok Neua (Thai Waterfall Beef Salad)

If you’re Hmong, you’ll notice very quickly that this dish is similar to laab. I’m not exactly sure what the difference between the two is but I read it somewhere that the difference is whether the meat is sliced or ground. Does anyone know? To my non-Hmong friends, laab is a popular Thai dish that has been adapted into the Hmong culture. I like this nam tok neua dish or Thai waterfall beef salad a little more than laab because the sliced steak offers you something more to chew on. This recipe calls for simple ingredients you should be able to find at your local asian store. Ready to give this a try?

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